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El Paso Drinking Sewage Water: A Drive to Fight Climate Change

Gregory

Do you know what’s really in your tap water? Is it being properly filtered? What kinds of chemicals are added to it before consumption? The people of El Paso, Texas know what’s in theirs…and even though it comes from their raw sewage and waste water supply, it’s perfectly clean and healthy.

 

climate change. drought, El Paso, Texas, sewage, water, water treatment, filtered, water filtration, global warming, 2100, raw waste water, rising temperature, CNN

Fred Hervey Water Reclamation Plant

 

A major strive in the fight against climate change, El Paso is taking matters into their own hands. With rising temperatures and increased droughts, water sourcing is a continuing—and growing—problem for a region that serves 700,000 people and receives an average rainfall of about 9 inches per year.

 

The solution in progress involves reusing water, thus minimizing their reliance on finding new sources. With an estimated 50 to 60 million gallons of waste water produced every day, this is a major supply they can draw upon. By reclaiming their raw waste water, they can turn it into water of drinkable quality.

 

climate change. drought, El Paso, Texas, sewage, water, water treatment, filtered, water filtration, global warming, 2100, raw waste water, rising temperature, CNN

Kay Bailey Hutchison Desalination Plant

 

It is a multi-step process, from base filtration to filtering out larger items such as rags, wipes, and leaves. Additionally, these multiple levels of filtering and disinfection rid pathogens and viruses. A mix of sand and bacteria, along with activated carbon granules—similar to the ones used in at-home water filters—do their part in ensuring that the water is as clean, safe, and tasty as possible.

 

 

 

 

 

climate change. drought, El Paso, Texas, sewage, water, water treatment, filtered, water filtration, global warming, 2100, raw waste water, rising temperature, CNN

Water treatment facility in El Paso

 

The process, however, isn’t without drawbacks. Costing about 10 times more than simply pumping water from the ground supply, it is a large expense for the region. But as Gilbert Trejo, chief technical officer of El Paso Water puts it, “it’s the logical next step for us to take.” Despite the cost, it does provide up to 10 million gallons of water to be reused, which is a major investment in the fight against drought and climate change. If steps like this aren’t taken, it’s predicted that the temperature in the region could rise by 8°F by the year 2100.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Could this be the future of our water? If so, then it’s already here.

 

climate change. drought, El Paso, Texas, sewage, water, water treatment, filtered, water filtration, global warming, 2100, raw waste water, rising temperature, CNN

Water Reclamation Diagram

 

For more information and a video by CNN, see the originally published article here: https://lompocrecord.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/el-paso-to-drink-treated-sewage-water-due-to-climate/article_909c1055-7f06-5d9f-861b-7cb71030b22e.html

 

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