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Can You Use Human Waste as Bricks…Apparently You Can!

Gregory

brick, construction, waste, human waste, poop, toilet, plumbing, plumber, australia, sustainable, sustainability, climate change, environment, professor, durability, landfill, clayNever did you ever think that would be a sentence you’d read. Human waste as bricks…does that even make sense? Well, according to Professor Abbas Mohajerani from RMIT University in Australia, it does.

 

For the past 15 years he’s been committed to this project, and it’s lead him down the road of human waste. He recently discovered that there’s a way to transform human waste into bricks that can be used for construction.

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You probably have a lot of concerns with this. So let’s address them! No, the bricks don’t smell bad. The waste only makes up about 25% of the material breakdown, with the other 75% being traditional clay. The goal of this is to cut down on the amount of biosolid material that would be used as landfills, and this method does just that by 30%.

 

In fact, these bricks are so solid that they pass construction and global building regulations. Adding this extra feature to them also increased the lifespan of the bricks, too, as well as help with their ability to insulate.

 

Professor Mohajerani says that by creating these new bricks, it is not only helping to cut down on the amount of sand and unsustainable materials used, but will also create materials that have a longer lifespan and will further help with sustainability.

 

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So, it seems that by building bricks that are partially made of human waste–an organic material that there is already trouble disposing of–multiple environmental and sustainability problems will be solved, as well as improving on pre-existing building and construction methods. There’s no word on when these will be tested in the field, and if they will even come to market. But regardless, after 15 years of research, it is an interesting proposal.

 

 

Credit: open-mind

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